Highbury writes Strategic Alliance Agreement with leading geoenergy firm

Highbury has drawn up a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with a major North American supplier of geothermal exchange systems for large buildings. Highbury’s advanced technology will allow the company to expand its environmental capabilities to include the ultra-efficient conversion of biomass directly to heat, as well as the addition of heat recovery systems for cooling hot synthesis gas and gas-fuelled electrical generators.

Geothermal heating uses subterranean heat transfer systems to capture and circulate the earth’s natural warmth – significantly reducing energy costs, consumption and pollution.

Alberta coal ban is good news for Highbury

As part of its long-term Climate Change plan, Alberta’s NDP Government announced on Nov. 22 that the province will phase out all coal-fired power generation by 2030. Considering that as much as 65 percent of its electricity now comes from coal, the move will require huge infrastructure changes in the province. One beneficiary could be Highbury Energy.

“We’re ready to go” says Highbury Energy Inc. CEO Thomas Hobby. “Our tech platform is ideal for small-scale conversion of biomass to electricity in the 1 to10 megawatt range. This is a huge opportunity for us.”

Highbury has already been exploring renewable energy opportunities and partnerships in Alberta, though no formal agreement has yet been signed.

Highbury trade delegation targets pollution-choked China

In early December, Highbury Energy Inc. CEO Thomas Hobby returned from a trip to Korea and China with an energy industry delegation looking for ways to help reduce pollution. Despite continuing to open an average of four coal-fired power plants a week for energy to expand its economy, China – the world’s most polluted country – is desperately seeking technology and platforms for cleaner, more sustainable energy generation.

China’s great need for cleaner energy was on dramatic display as recently as late November, when three consecutive days of air quality readings over 200 (fine particles per cubic metre of air with a diameter of 2.5 micrometres or less) in Beijing forced the city to issue a red alert, restricting road use and closing factories.

Highbury’s Asia mission included trips to the Korea Institute of Energy Research, as well as to educational institutions and to a Chinese sewage sludge refiner responsible for 350 million customers.